The Spiritual War-Footwear For Spiritual Combat

It is written:

“and having shod your feet with the preparation of the gospel of peace…”. (Ephesians 6:15)

The Roman soldier sometimes had to fight in terrible conditions. Uneven terrain, badly cared-for roadways, and unpredictable weather could be the Roman soldier’s formula for defeat and death.

Often in this life, we find ourselves on uncertain ground. Indeed, the enemy often lures us into dangerous terrain in order to try and destroy us! This is where the metaphor of this passage becomes so relevant. Paul tells the Christians that they need to constantly shod their feet with the preparation of the Gospel of peace.”

Ingram writes:

“Roman sandals were strapped up to the knee and tightly fastened to the soldier’s leg. The soles had knobs and sometimes nails protruding from them—an ancient version of athletic cleats. Alexander the Great is said to have invented these or at least championed them. He gave credit for many of the Greek army’s impressive victories to the firm footing of its forces. When soldiers have a solid foundation, they can stand unmoved against their opposition. They don’t slip or lose their balance very often if their feet are gripping the ground. That’s the picture Paul wants us to have of ourselves: soldiers with feet solidly planted in certainty.” (Chip Ingram, The Invisible War: What Every Believer Needs To Know About Satan, Demons, And Spiritual Warfare, 100 (Kindle Edition); Grand Rapids, Michigan; Baker Books)

The enemy will often try and lead us into dangerous terrain and uncertain conditions in this life as they attack us. What enables us able to stand, fight, advance, and gain victory in the unpredictable climate of this life and the relentless hostility of the enemy is the good news of the Gospel. It is the Good News-of who Jesus is, of who we are in Christ, and what we have access to in the church-that we are able to overcome the enemy (Ephesians 1:3-11; 3:9-11).

Leave a Reply

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: